Science for Progress

because science is fundamental in the 21st century

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19 Insecurity and Uncertainties for Early Career Academics – with Maria Pinto

Academics are Spoiled. Right?

The stereotype of academics is that they live a well protected life in the ivory tower. But this is not the case for most of them. Maria Pinto from Portugal is a PhD student in marine microbiology in Austria. With the final stages of her work approaching, Maria is beginning to think about the future.

Forgoing Salaries, Benefits, and Life Planning Security in your Late 20s to 40s.

We talk about the many uncertainties in academia, particularly for early career researchers. In general the salaries are not good, but in poorer countries, where the salaries are particularly low and may not even include social security, there is also an expectation of students to pay field work trips themselves. In general, traveling in order to present your work at conferences is important to researchers and their careers, but for many, this is not affordable.

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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

SfProcur Curators February 05 – 10: Maxie Gottschling and Helene Brinken for @FIT4RRIEU

Helene Brinken

Maxie Gottschling and Helene Brinken work at Göttingen State and University Library for the project FIT4RRI in the field of “Open Science” and “Responsible Research and Innovation” (RRI).

Maxie has a Master’s degree in Cultural Anthropology. She has been working in Open Access related projects since 2010. With a background in Information Science, Helene started her activities for Open Science and RRI in 2017.

Maxie Gottschling

Together they work on promoting and sharing best practices on responsible research. A RRI-way of research means to involve all actors influenced by ones’ activities and to make sure the processes are inclusive, reflective, transparent as well as adaptive to change. Helene and Maxie hope to inspire scientists to start their journey towards practicing RRI. At the same time, they would like to raise awareness to the public that citizens are a major player in science; they can and must be involved in research that frames their future. Aligning research with the values of society is a key principle of RRI.

Background

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about SfP_admin

New Design in Merchandise Store!

In case you did not know, we do have a merchandise store with Teepublic! And I try to make a new Science for Progress design every month! Or every other month! Or so!

When I put a new design up, there is a 3 day sale during which you can get things with this design on it at a 30% discount!

The sale for this design ends February 3rd 2019, 12:30pm (ca)

So, just now I added this design:

Tardigrade I design

You can put it on t-shirts, mugs, laptop bags, cushions, stickers, baby onesies(!!), phone cases, and a couple of other things!

I really enjoy making these designs, and I hope you like them, too!

Also, I get a small percentage from every sold item!

about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

SfProcur Curators January 29 – February 3: Linda Amarante and Samantha White – @OpenBehavior

Linda Amarante and Samantha White are two PhD students at American University in Washington, D.C., USA. Besides researching the role of the prefrontal cortex in decision making in rats, they help run the OpenBehavior website and its @OpenBehavior twitter account. There, they share and promote open source, low-cost software and hardware that can be used for behavioral neuroscience.

Linda and Samantha are excited to make scientists and non-scientists aware of the benefits of open science. They’ll show examples of how these creative projects can be used in neuroscience and other scientific disciplines, but also how they are interesting for the DIY hobbyists as well. In their week on @SfProcur, they hope to inspire us all with new ideas for scientific research and collaboration.

Background

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about Susan Leemburg

Susan received her PhD in neuroscience in 2011 in Zurich, Switzerland. She worked as a postdoctoral researcher until 2017 and is currently looking for the next adventure.

Monthly Newsletter!

I am happy to announce our new monthly newsletter! I will share what’s new, what happened in the previous month, and what’s going to happen in future!

about SfP_admin

18 B&D Animal Use and Statistics of Equivalence

In the light of the latest animal use numbers in Germany (2017), Bart and I are having a conversation about animal use in fundamental research. We then move on to talk about a new statistical method that might help researchers get some of their data out of their drawers and into an article!

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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

17 From PhD to SciComm via BookTube – with Deboki Chakravarti

Science Communication is one way academics can apply themselves outside of academia. But how does one transition between careers? I talked with Dr. Deboki Chakravarti, a biomedical engineer who worked on cancer treatments. She graduated in 2018 and then did an internship with Scientific American, a leading brand in Science Communication in the USA.

First we learn a little bit about her scientific work, and her personal experiences in graduate school. Already during graduate school she began a YouTube channel about books and life as a graduate student. She then shares why she decided to leave academia, and she explains how she managed to find an internship with Scientific American. And finally, she explains what the internship looks like.
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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

16 B&D: CRISPR Babies

At the end of November 2018, Chinese scientist He Jiankui announced that he had genetically modified human embryos which were then brought to term. The resulting twin sisters appear to be healthy. But this experiment was not greeted with enthusiasm by the scientific community.

The critique attacks every aspect of the experiment: the treatment’s medical necessity, the reasoning behind the treatment approach, the way it was conducted, the ethical implications, and it also wasn’t legal.

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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

SfProcur Curator December 19 – December 23: Lauriane Nallet – @lnk1618

Lauriane Nallet-Khosrofian is a PhD candidate in Neuroscience in
Zürich, Switzerland. As we talked about in a previous podcast episode, she is concerned about mental health of PhDs and Postdocs. She is further interested in the place of gender equality in academia, and science communication. Lauriane tries to participate in different projects regarding these topics: interviews, podcasts, blogs… Recently, she started the launch of the scientific festival “Pint Of Science” in Zürich.

During her week on @SfPRocur, she will talk about skills of academics that are transferable to other workplaces, and different ways of personal growth outside of the lab.

background

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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

Where to Subscribe to our Podcast.

It has been a while since I made the first video on how to subscribe to our podcast, and since then some things has changed. In particular, Spotify is now listing Science for Societal Progress. Also, Google launched a new podcast app, that is included in Android – and they found us, too, already!

So, the video is for new podcast listeners who want to subscribe to Science for Societal Progress. But, of course, the principle is the same for all podcasts:

There are two categories of tools you can use:

1. Podcast / Audio Apps such as
— Google Podcast (Android native)
— ITunes / Apple Podcast (iOs native)
— stitcher, player.fm, blubrry, etc.
— Spotify

2. RSS feed readers (I use feedly)

Do you have questions, comments or suggestion? Email info@scienceforprogress.eu, write us on facebook or twitter, or leave us a video message on Skype for dennis.eckmeier.

Become a Patron!

about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

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