Science for Progress

because science is fundamental in the 21st century

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Monthly Newsletter!

I am happy to announce our new monthly newsletter! I will share what’s new, what happened in the previous month, and what’s going to happen in future!

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18 B&D Animal Use and Statistics of Equivalence

In the light of the latest animal use numbers in Germany (2017), Bart and I are having a conversation about animal use in fundamental research. We then move on to talk about a new statistical method that might help researchers get some of their data out of their drawers and into an article!

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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

17 From PhD to SciComm via BookTube – with Deboki Chakravarti

Science Communication is one way academics can apply themselves outside of academia. But how does one transition between careers? I talked with Dr. Deboki Chakravarti, a biomedical engineer who worked on cancer treatments. She graduated in 2018 and then did an internship with Scientific American, a leading brand in Science Communication in the USA.

First we learn a little bit about her scientific work, and her personal experiences in graduate school. Already during graduate school she began a YouTube channel about books and life as a graduate student. She then shares why she decided to leave academia, and she explains how she managed to find an internship with Scientific American. And finally, she explains what the internship looks like.
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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

16 B&D: CRISPR Babies

At the end of November 2018, Chinese scientist He Jiankui announced that he had genetically modified human embryos which were then brought to term. The resulting twin sisters appear to be healthy. But this experiment was not greeted with enthusiasm by the scientific community.

The critique attacks every aspect of the experiment: the treatment’s medical necessity, the reasoning behind the treatment approach, the way it was conducted, the ethical implications, and it also wasn’t legal.

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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

SfProcur Curator December 19 – December 23: Lauriane Nallet – @lnk1618

Lauriane Nallet-Khosrofian is a PhD candidate in Neuroscience in
Zürich, Switzerland. As we talked about in a previous podcast episode, she is concerned about mental health of PhDs and Postdocs. She is further interested in the place of gender equality in academia, and science communication. Lauriane tries to participate in different projects regarding these topics: interviews, podcasts, blogs… Recently, she started the launch of the scientific festival “Pint Of Science” in Zürich.

During her week on @SfPRocur, she will talk about skills of academics that are transferable to other workplaces, and different ways of personal growth outside of the lab.

background

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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

Where to Subscribe to our Podcast.

It has been a while since I made the first video on how to subscribe to our podcast, and since then some things has changed. In particular, Spotify is now listing Science for Societal Progress. Also, Google launched a new podcast app, that is included in Android – and they found us, too, already!

So, the video is for new podcast listeners who want to subscribe to Science for Societal Progress. But, of course, the principle is the same for all podcasts:

There are two categories of tools you can use:

1. Podcast / Audio Apps such as
— Google Podcast (Android native)
— ITunes / Apple Podcast (iOs native)
— stitcher, player.fm, blubrry, etc.
— Spotify

2. RSS feed readers (I use feedly)

Do you have questions, comments or suggestion? Email info@scienceforprogress.eu, write us on facebook or twitter, or leave us a video message on Skype for dennis.eckmeier.

Become a Patron!

about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

15 Animal Welfare in Scientific Research – with Nuno Franco

I talked with Dr. Nuno Henrique Franco about animal welfare in scientific research. The questions we address are

  • Why do we do animal experiments?
  • What can be done to reduce the amount of animal experiments?
  • What are the regulations for animal research?
  • What do scientists think about the ethics of animal experimentation?
  • What is being done for outreach?

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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

SfProcur Curator November 27 – December 2: Cleyde Helena – @Doctor_PMS

Dr. Cleyde Helena is a neuroendocrinologist from Brazil, who moved to the USA eleven years ago. She currently works as an Academic Account Manager, and she also consults about sales for protocols.io. She believes in the company and in their motto for increasing the quality and reproducibility of science.

You may already know her from our podcast episode on the Recovering Academic Podcast. In this podcast, she and the other two members of their team talk about the experience of leaving academia, and how to manage the career transition period professionally and emotionally.

about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

14 B&D: Journals, SciComm, and GMOs

Once a month I sit down with my friend and co-host Bart Geurten. We talk about things within and around academia, and exchange opinions on earlier episodes.

In this episode, we first talk about the concept of overlay journals in the context of the newly founded community based journal “Neurons, Behavior, Data Analysis, and Theory”. NBDT is a journal for computational neuroscience, and it’s community lead, completely free, open, and not for profit.

We then talk about the role researchers should play in the dissemination of science to the public. This discussion has been on the internet for a while. In one of her recent youtube videos, the German science communicator Mai Thi Nguyen-Kim picked it up. She says, scientists should be forced to write summaries for a lay readership for every one of their articles.

And in the main section we revisit my interview with Hélène Pidon on GMOs. We talk about the fears we think are behind the anti-GMO sentiments, and why the verdict of the EU court on gene modification was unscientific.

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about Dennis Eckmeier

Dennis founded Science for Progress. He received a PhD in neuroscience in 2010 in Germany. Until 2018 he worked as a postdoc in the USA, and Portugal. In 2017 he co-organized the March for Science in Lisbon, Portugal. Dennis is currently a freelancer.

SfProcur Curator November 13 – 18: Mathis Riehle – @morenorse

Dr. Mathis Riehle is Reader in Cell Engineering at the University of Glasgow. By documenting different things from a typical week of a Principal Investigator (PI), he will show how diverse the job of a scientist can be. His other passion are scientific sketchnotes that he takes while attending talks.

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about Katharina Hennig

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